Claydoh beads

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Dough Air Dry Beads

We're still working our way through the list. Rather than calling it an activity a day for March, I should have realized it would take us all spring and that we still probably wouldn't do everything on it. I think the current count is about 18 out of 31 activities. Ha! I believe someone mentioned the word overambitious?

Dough Air Dry Beads

Our most recent activity from the list is the claydoh beads from MaryAnn Kohl's Preschool Art, which it turns out is the same recipe as the big beads we made last year from her First Art book.

You need to mix 3/4 cup flour, 1/2 cup cornstarch, 1/2 cup salt, and 3/8 cup water.

Dough Air Dry Beads

This time we dyed the dough green with some food coloring. The dough was still a bit tricky to work with — it crumbled easily and Maia had a hard time forming it into balls. So I did most of the shaping, while she played with the beads I made — stacking them into snowmen, making caterpillars, eating the lollipops, etc.

Dough Air Dry Beads

The directions called for skewering them on toothpicks set in a ball of playdough while they dried, which worked out pretty well. Maia loved doing that part.

Dough Air Dry Beads

Even though we had dyed the beads green, we decided to paint some of them with tempera. The ceramic flower cups are part of a set I found at the thrift store for the studio. I think they're the perfect size for holding paint — and easy to clean, too.

Dough Air Dry Beads

The paint went on bright, but soaked into the beads and dried much lighter. We strung them on doubled up embroidery floss this time using an embroidery needle.



 
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  1. elizabeth says

    sorry for all lower case letters but i’m holding my newborn. wpuld you recommend this recipe or is there another one out there that does not crumble?