How to Make Felted Wool Easter Eggs

Make Felted Wool Easter Eggs for the Nature Table

Make Wool Felted Easter Eggs

This post contains affiliate links. I told you I wanted to try some simple wool felting with Maia. We made felted wool Easter eggs for our spring nature table.

I decided to go with SouleMama’s felting instructions in The Creative Family because it sounded the most hands on and immediate, although I’d still like to try the other two I mentioned as well.

Here’s how to felt eggs…

Make Felted Wool Easter Eggs for the Nature Table

MATERIALS

INSTRUCTIONS

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She calls for a bowl of hot soapy water per person (1 tbsp dish soap per 2 cups water) and some raw carded wool.

Maia was really excited about trying this and loved playing with the wool before I even brought out the soapy water. She had some trouble making it into balls that stayed together though and lost interest after a while.

The trick apparently is to wrap a strand of wool tightly around itself into a little ball, soak it in the soapy water, roll it around in your hands, wrap more wool tightly around the ball, soak it, roll it, etc, until you have a ball the size you want.

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Perhaps it would be better for someone slightly older than Maia. Although in retrospect, I probably shouldn’t have limited the project by saying we were going to make balls and eggs.

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I made several little eggs and enjoyed the process. Maia mostly watched. We might try this again sometime. Or one of the other felting techniques.

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We added the eggs to the spring nature table, tucked inside a nest of the fluffy yellow wool.

Unfortunately the weather outdoors does not match this sunny spring corner of our house. We’ve had snow and freezing weather for the last couple of days! And here I thought I lived in the south! The garden is covered, my new cherry tree is wrapped up, and all my seedlings and plants have been brought inside. But soon it will be warm again and we will be puttering in the garden. I can’t wait.

Update :: We’ve since made wool felted rocks, too!

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How to Make Felted Wool Easter Eggs

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15 Comments

  • Reply
    Donna - Growing Great Kids
    April 8, 2009 at 5:42 am

    Sooooooooo sweet! That turned out great!

  • Reply
    Fun Mama - Deanna
    April 8, 2009 at 5:45 am

    I’ve been considering doing this with my two year old, but may wait until it’s warm enough to do outside. Thanks for the tip about not planning on it being a specific result.
    We wrapped our apple trees yesterday in Kentucky, but didn’t have enough to wrap the cherries too. It’s the first year I’ve gotten blooms on anything, but I think I’ll loose them!

  • Reply
    Becca
    April 8, 2009 at 6:44 am

    Love these! They came out so beautiful!

  • Reply
    Jen Hennessy
    April 8, 2009 at 10:47 am

    hmmmm….. sounds like a definite PROCESS over result kind of activity, I think I will wait till summer for this one! Your eggs and nest are just beautiful, though

  • Reply
    jill
    April 8, 2009 at 10:57 am

    Hi Jean, these are adorable, and I love the expression on Maia’s face in that photo! Speaking of nests…I’ve been meaning to tell you that my daughter has been wearing a nest shirt from your etsy shop for the past year and a half and it still looks great (after a zillion washings), and we both still love it.
    Hoping spring comes to stay soon. =)

  • Reply
    Tanya
    April 8, 2009 at 1:04 pm

    I wanted to suggest for those who dont want to do this as a easter activity that you make felt marbles with your child :) same process instead just make them round!

  • Reply
    The Artful Parent
    April 8, 2009 at 11:05 am

    Jill – I love hearing that. :) Thank you.
    Deanna – Oh, I hope you get some fruit this year! I can’t wait until we have some homegrown fruit. I have a new plum tree, too, although the nursery said to remove the blossoms/fruit the first year so the roots get established. I think I’ll leave a couple on just to taste them!

  • Reply
    Melissa
    April 8, 2009 at 3:58 pm

    I keep meaning to make these myself– my only kid felting attempt did not turn out well (imagine a sheep, dyed red, immersed in water. Hanks and hanks of red sheep lying in little mats all over my kitchen…) I love your little nest, too– just the right amount of fluff.

  • Reply
    Ginger Carlson
    April 8, 2009 at 4:22 pm

    These are especially fun if you start the wool around a little jingle bell that is slipped inside something like a wiffle/ping-pong ball. Of course they would then be a little bigger than your cute little eggs. :)

  • Reply
    This Girl Loves to Talk
    April 8, 2009 at 2:21 pm

    those eggs are GORGEOUS!! I would love some for my table.. I find that roving hard to find in Australia… I am sure i am just not looking in the right place

  • Reply
    little prince's mummy
    April 8, 2009 at 9:24 pm

    Nice arts

  • Reply
    Brooke
    April 8, 2009 at 9:53 pm

    These turned out great! I’m addicted to wet felting and needle felting lately. It’s so much fun! I love the little wool nest too. They all look so wonderful together!

  • Reply
    Jen
    April 10, 2009 at 10:19 pm

    Very cool! Looks like fun and something unique to try with the kids! Thanks for sharing!
    Jen
    Creative and Curious Kids!
    http://raisingcreativeandcuriouskids.blogspot.com
    God’s Shining Stars
    http://godsshiningstars.blogspot.com

  • Reply
    Family Fun with Arts The Chiah Family
    April 11, 2009 at 10:47 pm

    […] tried to find some ideas and very tempted to try out the ideas from preschool-daze and artful parent. They have good sharings and interested arty mommies here may try them out. As for us, I […]

  • Reply
    mayarivirginia
    April 12, 2009 at 9:20 am

    Hey Jean:)
    The boys and I tried this project today, and they both loved it (until their dad started mowing the lawn and they abandoned me for a ride on the mower, that is…:) I can’t wait til our eggs dry and we find a little spot for them and our nest.

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